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A bulgarian wedding in Rome: Elitsa e Zdravko

As often happens with foreign couples who are going to getting married in Rome, Elitsa and Zdravko found us on the Internet. However we were lucky enough to meet and get to know each other some time before their marriage, because they came to Rome to complete the organization of their marriage.

We liked them from the beginning and I can say with certainty that the sympathy was mutual.

They are both architects and the passion for their jobs led them from Bulgaria to get married in Rome because they both love every aspect of the Eternal City, among all obviously historycal and architectural ones.

During the planning of the wedding shooting, however, they surprised and inspired us asking to be guided in hidden places in Rome, in order to be shot in peace and tranquillity in uncrowded areas.
Therefore we proposed some ideas, leaving space to improvisation in management of times and movements.

After the couple got ready in their hotel, we went together to the church of San Paolo alla Regola, the only church in Rome where at the moment it is possible to celebrate a traditional Bulgarian wedding. Together with us, a small group of guests attended the orthodox wedding ceremony, for what was really a intimate wedding in Italy.
Entering into the church we saw an unusual setting for a Catholic church: the altar was embellished with red and gold fabrics, and many golden icons are placed all around. On a small table there were some elements that were to be used during the ceremony: two orthodox wedding crowns, some homemade bread, a glass with wine and a cross.
The orthodox wedding ceremony really struck us, I'm going to describe it for those who do not know it.

The first part of the traditional Bulgarian wedding involves the exchange of wedding vows and takes place at the entrance of the church: the celebrant, intoning a litany, lights two candles joined by a ribbon and delivers them to the couple, who will hold them in their hands for the entire ceremony. Then, continuing in his prayers, the priest puts the rings on the finger of the right hands of bride and groom, after which ther best man exchanges them several times. This ritual symbolizes the continuous exchange that the couple will have during their whole lives and that will enrich them spiritually.
At this stage the coronation rite begins in front of the altar: the priest places two crowns on the head of bride and groom. Also the crowns, just as the rings, will be exchanged several times. The final blessing, with the bride and groom holding hands and the cross resting on them, states that bride and groom became husband and wife.

In the orthodox wedding ceremony there is still room for a final ritual: the sharing of bread and wine (which, in this case, does not represent the body and the blood of Christ), with an obvious metaphorical meaning, and a short procession consisting of three laps around the table.

After the orthodox wedding ceremony, we separated from the guests and started our tour for a couple shooting in hidden places in Rome or, in some cases, places usually crowded but with unusual perspectives, to allow as much intimacy as possible.

I believe that this wedding photo shoot in Rome is decidedly unusual: I find it very intimate and delicate. Almost as if the everyday life of a city ​​like Rome suspended itself to leave room for the marriage of this sweet, quiet and shy couple, who wanted to celebrate one of the most important days of their life not among so many people, but in the quiet and intimacy of their love.
Because silence can be more intense than noise.

Orthodox wedding ceremony: San Paolo alla Regola, Roma
Make-up Artist: Le Spose di Nadia, Roma
Bridal dress: Carrie Bridal Boutique, Sofia

Photos: Francesco Galdieri

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Our pictures are amazing

We found InstantiSenzaTempo on the internet and we were very lucky because Francesco and Andrea are great people, great professionals and our pictures are amazing. Many thanks to them both and thanks to Francesco who helped us with the organization, gave us many suggestions and ideas and everything went out just as we had imagined it. Thank you guys!

— Elitsa and Zdravko —

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